Hoyt 2021 Altus Compound Bow

Hoyt Archery introduced the Altus compound bow as part of its target lineup for 2021.

In this video, Lancaster Archery Supply’s P.J. Reilly runs through the specs and features of this 38-inch-long bow that’s going to be a great choice for all forms of target archery.

The Altus is available with two different cams – the DCX and SVX. The DCX version will be a little smoother to draw and hold, as compared to the SVX, which is built more for speed.

The most noticeable feature of the Altus to Hoyt target fans is the fact that it does not have a shoot-through riser. Dual bridges in the riser produce the bow’s rigidity, versus the shoot-through construction.

Hoyt is marketing the Altus as “another price option” in its target lineup because it’s not the most expensive, nor is it the least expensive bow.

Watch now to learn all about this new target bow from Hoyt.

Know Your Archery Glues

Stick it, for the win!

Archery is a game that requires lots of glue.

We glue points, inserts and nock bushings inside arrow shafts. We glue vanes, feathers and certain nocks onto arrow shafts.

Sometimes you want bonds to be permanent. Sometimes, you want to be able to separate parts later.

To get the right parts to stick the right way, you’ve got to know your archery glues.

CYANOACRYLATES

This is a family of fast-setting gels and liquid glues commonly used for fletchings, point inserts and sometimes nock bushings and nocks.

You’d use a cyanoacrylate for anything you want to stick permanently and quickly. Let’s say you’re putting a point insert into a hunting arrow to receive screw-in field points and broadheads. You’d use a cyanoacrylate because these inserts typically are intended to be permanent.

Attaching fletchings to arrows is a common use for cyanoacrylates because the glue enables the fletchings to stick where you put them very quickly. Pay attention to the type of cyanoacrylate you choose for fletching. Not all work equally well on both plastic vanes and feathers. Likewise, if you’re working with wood arrows, some of these glues work better on wood than others.

HOT MELTS

These glues come in stick form. You apply a flame to the glue to melt it into whatever you want to stick to another surface.

Hot melts are great for products you might remove, such as points and nock bushings. Should the time come, you can heat the point or bushing, which will loosen the glue, and that component can then be easily removed.

Understand, however, that you should never subject carbon to high heat, like an open flame. That will cause the carbon to crack.

Another method for softening hot melt that’s already holding components in place is to use hot water. Let’s say you want to remove a point that’s glued in place inside a carbon arrow. Submerge the arrow end into a pot of hot water for a few seconds, and the glue will soften so you can remove the point with a pair of pliers. (Don’t use your hands or you’ll burn them.)

This is a safe way to remove components from carbon arrows without damaging the carbon.

COLD MELT

Cold melt glues also come in stick form, and are applied by heating them. They require less heat than hot melts to liquify the glue, however.

Cold melts are great for gluing components where you don’t want to use high heat – such as anything being inserted into a carbon arrow shaft. The lower melting temperature required to liquify these glues minimizes the risk of damaging carbon.

They’re great for nock bushings, since these bushings sit so close to arrow shafts. So let’s say you want to remove a bushing. You’ll have to heat it to liquify the glue holding it in place. Since the bushing is so close to the shaft, if it were held in place with hot melt, the amount of heat required to loosen the glue might be enough to damage the carbon, where the lesser amount of heat required to loosen a cold melt would be safer.

EPOXY

Epoxies used for archery purposes usually require a mix of two liquids at the time the glue is applied. Epoxies don’t set up fast, so you have time to work with your products to get them in position, before they stick. Once an epoxy cures, it usually forms one of the hardest bonds you’ll find. Epoxies are great for hidden inserts that can take some time to position correctly inside arrow shafts, and for bow grips.

2020 Elite Rezult Compound Target Bow Review

Ahead of the 2020 indoor target season, Elite Archery has introduced the Rezult compound target bow.

In this video, watch Lancaster Archery Supply’s P.J. Reilly interview Elite engineer Josh Sidebottom and Elite pro archer Nathan Brooks about the unique features and technologies offered in the Rezult.

The Rezult is a 38-inch-long bow, with the most significant feature being Elite’s all-new S.E.T. technology. With S.E.T. technology, an archer can adjust the limb pocket while tuning to achieve proper arrow launching.

To work in conjunction with this technology, Elite built a beefier, more stable cam and cable system to help reduce cam lean and increase consistency.

With the advancements built into this bow, it seems likely the Rezult will help some of Elite’s top archers climb up on podiums in 2020.

2019 Lancaster Archery Classic Sees Records Broken and New Champions Crowned

The 2019 Lancaster Archery Classic Jan. 25-27 was one for the history books. Not only did the number of registered archers – 1,794 – shatter last year’s record attendance of 1,488, but Open Pro archer Braden Gellenthien accomplished something that had only ever been done once before in the 16-year history of the East Coast’s largest archery tournament.

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In qualifications Friday at the Spooky Nook Sports Complex in Manheim, Pa., Gellenthien, who is one of the world’s most accomplished tournament archers, shot a perfect score of 660. All 60 of his arrows found the center 11 ring. The only time that has ever happened before was in 2009, when Reo Wilde posted a 660 qualification score.

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Braden Gellenthien poses with his two perfect targets

But as we all quickly learned Saturday morning, shooting a great qualification score does not mean anything in terms of getting to the Classic finals shoot-up stage if you can’t get through the head-to-head elimination matches. Gellenthien survived his first match in the Open Pro bracket against Andy Callaway in a tie-breaker, but he was knocked out of the competition in the second round by Brian Meese.

Ultimately, the tournament’s top prize of $20,000 was awarded to Open Pro champ Jacob Marlow. Always a crowd favorite with his southern drawl and fun sense of humor on the line, Marlow finally won the Classic title in his third trip to the finals shoot-up.

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Open Pro champ Jacob Marlow with the winner’s trophy and belt buckle

“I tried not to think about anything else,” Marlow said. “I just focused on one arrow at a time.”

As his gold-medal match progressed against No. 1 qualifier and 2017 Classic Open Pro champ Mike Schloesser, Marlow’s shots seemed to get tighter and tighter to the center. Asked if he was feeling better as the match wore on, Marlow responded with his typical, self-deprecating humor.

“Oh no, I felt terrible the whole time,” he said. “I hate the nerves.”

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Jacob Marlow

In addition to the $20,000 he received from Lancaster Archery, Marlow added a $10,000 contingency check from his bow sponsor, Elite, and another $1,600 in contingencies from his other equipment sponsors.

“I’m 1-1 against Mikey in these matches, so hopefully we’ll get a rematch,” Marlow said of competing against Schloesser in the Classic finals.

Other notable champions crowned at this year’s Classic were Jack Williams in Men’s Recurve, Gabriela Bayardo in Women’s Recurve, Michael Fisher in Barebow and Tanja Jensen in Women’s Open Pro.

TIM ‘THE CEO’ HANLEY

The Men’s Open division is always the largest division at the Lancaster Archery Classic. This year, there were 317 archers who competed in that group of amateurs. To win that division, an archer has to be on top of his game, and he has to defeat a lot of other really good archers.

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Tim “The CEO” Hanley

Tim Hanley, 32, of New Jersey this year traveled to the Classic for the first time “in a number of years,” he said, and worked his way to the No. 8 seed for the finals shoot-up. That’s a tough spot to start from, given the Classic’s shoot-up finals format, where the first match features the two lowest ranked archers. The winner advances to compete against the next archer in ranking, and so on until someone faces off against the top qualifier for the title.

In the 16-year history of the Classic, no No. 8-ranked archer in Men’s Open has ever shot his way to the title. That would require shooting a minimum of 84 arrows, assuming no tie-breakers were needed, over the course of seven matches.

Wearing a long-sleeve, pin-striped dress shirt, Hanley won his first match, then his second, and then his third. By the fourth round, commenters watching the livestream on YouTube were referring to him as “Tim ‘The CEO’ Hanley,” because of his dress shirt. In the audience at Spooky Nook, the crowd began rallying behind Hanley as he shot his way through the field. By the time he faced off against top-qualifier Doug Williams, Hanley was clearly the crowd favorite. Everyone loves an underdog, right?

Against all odds, Hanley defeated Williams by a score of 130-127, meaning Hanley only missed two 11s in his seventh match of the day. He seemed to get stronger, when he should have gotten weaker.

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Tim Hanley pumps his fist

“I had already exceeded my expectations in getting to the finals,” Hanley said. “From there, I just trusted my shot and it turned out pretty good.”

BAREBOW CRAZE

The Barebow competition at the Classic has been growing by leaps and bounds the last few years, and this year was no exception. After reaching a registration total of 125 last year, the number of barebow competitors ballooned this year to 207.

On YouTube, the Barebow finals video from 2018 has been viewed nearly 250,000 times over the past year, generating incredible enthusiasm for and interest in that discipline. For the 2019 finals, the venue was packed with rowdy fans Saturday night, and more than 1,600 followed the livestream of the competition.

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Michael Fisher

The field featured four new faces on the Classic stage – Ben Rogers, Spanky Brooks, Michael Fisher and Grayson Partlowe. Missing were more familiar names, including John Demmer and Rich Barker, who got knocked out of the tournament in the elimination stage. Bobby Worthington, another Barebow finals regular, withdrew from the Classic at the last minute, due to illness.

The final match between Fisher and Partlowe was a see-saw battle, with Fisher ultimately coming out on top, shooting a dead-center 11 on his last shot. When his arrow hit the target, the arena erupted into cheers of, “Aussie! Aussie! Aussie! Oy! Oy! Oy!” That was a nod to Fisher’s Australian home.

NEW RECURVE CHAMPS

The Men’s and Women’s Recurve finals featured the usual field of heavy hitters. Casey Kaufhold, 14, led the Women’s field with a qualification score of 604. With three-time defending champ Mackenzie Brown knocked out in eliminations, Casey – who finished second to Brown the past two years – was a likely favorite. However, Gabriela Bayardo, whom Casey had beaten the two previous times the two had met at the Classic, shot just a little stronger in the gold-medal finals match, and took the title, with Casey finishing second.

Gabriela Bayardo

Gabriela Bayardo

On the Men’s side, two-time defending champ Brady Ellison was the top seed in the finals. In the gold-medal match, he squared off against Jack Williams who toppled two giants to get to Ellison. Williams, who is considered a favorite to join Ellison on the next U.S. Olympic Team, first defeated multi-Olympic medal winner Michelle Frangili of Italy. Next, he took down Canada’s top recurve archer, Crispin Duenas, who was runner-up to Ellison at the last two Classics.

Williams shot incredibly strong in his match against Ellison, with end scores of 31, 31, 31 and 33. Those scores topped Ellison by two points, and Williams took the title – his best finish at the Classic.

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Jack Williams

“This is a great venue and a wonderful tournament,” Williams said of the 2019 Classic. “My good shots just felt really strong today.”

Williams and Ellison compete regularly in training, so they are good friends, yet fierce competitors.

“I’m sure we’ll have a rematch sometime,” Williams said with a wide smile.

YOUTH TROPHY  TOURNAMENT

For the second year, the Easton Youth Trophy Tournament offered a tournament within the Classic for young archers who might not yet be ready for the full Classic tournament, but who want to get big-time competition experience.

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A total of 375 young archers competed in the event, which was confined solely to Saturday, and which cost a fraction of the money required to compete in the Classic. These archers shot the same number of arrows as shot in the Classic qualification – 60 – on the same field that the Classic archers shot on.

Archers were divided by gender, by equipment – compound, recurve and barebow – and by age, with divisions for Cub, Bowman, Cadet and Junior competitors. Winners were determined by scores posted in the 60-arrow round. And there were some serious scores put up by these young archers.

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Out of a possible 660 points, Foster Jones recorded a 624 to win the Compound Cadet Male division; Ryan Kitts won Compound Junior Male with a 633; Hannah Ball won Barebow Cadet Female, and posted the highest score among all the female barebow archers of any age, with a 434; Jada Cho’s 513 in Recurve Cub Female won that division. For a complete list of Easton Youth Trophy Tournament results, click here.

Many of the Youth Trophy archers and their parents said they enjoyed the experience they got from competing in a big venue with so many other archers. Count on this event to continue at future Classics, and for it to grow as the years pass.

Here are the top-three finishers in each of the 15 divisions at the 2019 Lancaster Archery Classic:

Men’s Open Pro – Jacob Marlow, Mike Schloesser and Dave Cousins

Women’s Open Pro – Tanja Jensen, Sarah Prieels, Dusti Batsch

Masters Open Pro – Benton Christensen, Keith Trail, Kendall Woody

Men’s Recurve – Jack Williams, Brady Ellison, Crispin Duenas

Women’s Recurve – Gabriela Bayardo, Casey Kaufhold, Virginie Chenier

Barebow – Michael Fisher, Grayson Partlowe, Spanky Brooks

Men’s Open – Tim Hanley, Doug Williams, Brad Baker Jr.

Women’s Open – Savannah Baye Vanderwier, Jamilee Moore, Sachi Keane

Senior Open – Glenn Talley, Benny Parenteau, Dee Wilde

Masters Open – Bob Reedinger, Danny Minnick, Wayne Johnson

Bowhunter – Charles Hunnell, Luke Long, John Wheeler

Youth Male Open – Trevor Silverson, Zachary Harris, Tyler Heritage

Youth Female Open – Faith Miller, Ava Dremann, Reagan Bryan

Youth Male Recurve – Dallas Jones, Joonsuh Oh, Zachary Kim

Youth Female Recurve – Whitney Jensen, Imogen Grzemski, Brianna Laux

Lancaster Archery Academy January-February Newsletter

It’s here!

The winter indoor archery season is in full swing, and at Lancaster Archery Academy, you can always find some paper punchers hanging around.

In the coming weeks, we’ve got tournaments scheduled and leagues kicking off. If the 20-yard, indoor game is your thing, then your season is here.

Of course, the highlight of the year is the annual Lancaster Archery Classic. It’s the largest indoor archery tournament on the East Coast, and to call it ‘fun’ would be an understatement. It’s a big event for the best pro archers in the world, for sure, but there’s plenty of competition on the range for amateurs as well.

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Check out the list of activities we’ve got on tap for January and February.

ARCHERY CLASSES

We’ve got multiple, 6-week classes starting soon in our Experience ArcheryIntermediate Archery and Introduction to Competitive Archery courses. Listed below are the start dates and class times. Unless specified, classes are open to all archers age 6 and older. Call (717) 556-1379 for information on any of the activities listed below.

EXPERIENCE ARCHERY – ALL AGES:  Jan. 7 and 30, 5-6 p.m.; Feb. 2, 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Feb. 25, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

INTERMEDIATE ARCHERY: Jan. 7 and 30, 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Feb. 2, 10-11 a.m.;  Feb. 25, 5-6 p.m.

INTRODUCTION TO COMPETITIVE ARCHERY: March 30, 2:30-3:30 p.m.

SPECIAL EVENTS

FITA ARCHERS OF PA INDOOR STATES:  Jan. 12-13; 60-arrow Star FITA competition. Register here.

LANCASTER ARCHERY CLASSIC: Jan. 25-27 at Spooky Nook Sports Complex, 75 Champ Blvd., Manheim, PA; LAS rules apply; 60-arrow qualification, followed by elimination matches and shoot-up finals. Register here.

U.S. INDOOR NATIONALS AND JOAD NATIONAL INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS: Feb. 22-24 for U.S. Nationals; Feb. 22-23 for JOAD Nationals. Both held on the Academy range. Click here for registration information for both events.

WINTER TARGET LEAGUE: 10-week league starts Jan. 9; FITA 30-arrow round, with Classic scoring; 6-8 p.m. every Wednesday. Register here.

TECHNOHUNT LEAGUE: 10-week league starts Jan. 9; 30-arrow sessions. Register here.

LEVEL 2 COACH CERTIFICATION COURSE: Jan. 4-5. Earn your Level 2 certification to work with programs including JOAD, NASP and collegiate and local clubs. Register here. 

COFFEE CLUB: Join us every Friday morning at 9 a.m. to eat donuts, drink coffee and shoot your bow.

Competition Archery Media Announces 2019 Schedule

Competition Archery Media has solidified its 2019 schedule to bring to the public professional coverage of the biggest and best archery competitions across the United States. CAM will partner with the National Field Archery Association (NFAA) to provide additional coverage of The Vegas Shoot and Indoor World Series Final; and the NFAA Indoor Nationals. CAM also will provide exclusive coverage of USA Archery competitions in 2019, in addition to the full season of Archery Shooters Association (ASA) events, to include the ASA Winter CanAm Classic.

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CAM is a company of professionals who have decades of experience providing television broadcast coverage of professional and amateur sports events, including archery.

Following is CAM’s 2019 schedule of events. Tournaments highlighted in bold text will feature live coverage of final shootdowns or medal matches. Other events will feature taped, daily summary shows, scoring updates, photo galleries and more.

* Lancaster Archery Classic, Jan. 25-27, Manheim, Pa.

* The Vegas Shoot, Feb. 8-10, Las Vegas, Nevada

* ASA Hoyt Archery Pro/Am, Feb. 21-24, Foley, Ala.

* 2019 ASA Winter CanAm Classic, March 7-10, Verona, N.Y.

* USA Archery National Indoor Final, March 15, Cincinnati, Ohio

* NFAA Indoor Nationals, March 15-17, Cincinnati, Ohio

* ASA New Breed & Black Eagle Pro/Am, March 21-24, Mitchell, Ala.

* USA Archery Arizona Cup, April 5-7, Phoenix, Ariz.

* ASA Easton Southwest Shootout, April 25-28, Paris, Texas

* Western Classic Trail Shoot and NFAA Marked 3D Championships, May 3-4, Redding, Calif.

* ASA TRUBall/Vortex Pro/Am, May 16-19, Augusta, Ga.

* USA Archery Gator Cup, May 31-June 2, Newberry, Fla.

* ASA Mathews Pro/Am, June 20-23, London, Ky.

* McKenzie ASA Classic, Aug. 1-4, Metropolis, Ill.

* USA Archery Outdoor Target Nationals, Aug. 14-17, Dublin, Ohio

For more information about CAM, visit our website.

2019 Hoyt RX-3, Helix and ProForce FX Compound Bows

Hoyt introduced its 2019 lineup of compound bows, which include the RX-3, Helix and ProForce FX bows. In this video, Hoyt sales representative Gus Edwards describes the three bows to LAS TechXpert P.J. Reilly.

The RX-3 is Hoyt’s flagship carbon hunting bow. The RX-3 measures 30.5 inches, with a 6-inch brace height and IBO speed rating of 342 feet per second. The RX-3 Ultra measures 34 inches long, with a 6.75-inch brace height and IBO speed rating of 334 feet per second. The RX-3 Turbo is 31 inches long, with a 6-inch brace height and IBO speed rating of 350 feet per second.

Hoyt redesigned the carbon riser of the RX series to be wider, which helps kill hand shock. All RX bows also feature an adjustable grip that can be moved laterally to help in tuning the bow.

The Helix is an aluminum bow that measures 30.5 inches long, with a 6-inch brace height and IBO speed rating of 342 feet per second. It also comes in an Ultra version which is 34 inches long, with a 6.75-inch brace height and IBO speed rating of 334 feet per second.

The ProForce FX is a mainly target bow Hoyt introduced for 2019, featuring Hoyt’s signature shoot-through riser. It measures 32.75 inches long, with a 6-inch brace height and IBO speed rating of 332 feet per second.

What’s the difference between a target bow and a hunting bow?

What’s the difference between a hunting bow and a target bow?

Maybe you’ve wondered this on a recent trip to your local archery pro shop when you eyed up the selection of hunting recurve and compound bows in one area and those labeled for target archery in another.

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Except for the muted colors or camo that dominates the hunting selection, versus the bright colors of the target bows, they sure look the same, right?

They are, to a certain extent. But there also are some very calculated differences. Let’s start with compound bows.

Target compounds are going to be longer than hunting compounds. Target bows commonly measure 38-40 inches from axle to axle, while hunting bows usually fall in the 28-34-inch range.

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This target compound bow measures 38 inches long.

The longer bows offer an archer a better chance at precision shooting, because the string angle at full draw is not as severe as it is on a shorter bow, brace heights are often bigger 7-8 inches – and the bows tend to be very “forgiving.” A forgiving bow is one that allows an archer to make tiny mistakes in form, but keeps the arrow going where the archer wants it.

Hunting bows are built shorter so bowhunters can navigate through thick brush or hunt in the tight quarters of a ground blind or tree stand. Maneuverability and portability are the main features of hunting bows. Also, short brace heights of 5-6 inches – which are not very forgiving – help generate lots of arrow speed. Fast-shooting bows can minimize poor hits caused by animals moving before an arrow gets to them.

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Hunting compound bows need to be maneuverable.

Though not always, most target compounds offer the archer the option to reduce the amount of let-off – to 60-75 percent – which increases holding weight at full draw. Many target archers like that increased holding weight because it gives them more control of their bows and it makes it easier for them to activate their release aids.

Bowhunters, on the other hand, often prefer a lot of let-off – 80-90 percent – to minimize the holding weight. A bowhunter might have to hold a bow at full draw for an extended period waiting for a game animal to offer the perfect shot opportunity. The less weight they’re holding for that period, the longer they can hold it and stay still.

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Target compound bows are built for precision accuracy.

With recurve bows, you’re also likely to see target bows generally being longer than hunting models. Full target recurve bows used by adult men tend to run 66-72 inches long; women will shoot target bows 64-70 inches. Hunting recurves usually are anywhere from 50-64 inches.

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A recurve bow built for target archery is long and forgiving.

Again, the difference is precision accuracy versus mobility and arrow speed. The target archer wants a long, forgiving bow with an open string angle. For recurve archers, the open string angle is more conducive to a clean release of the string drawn with fingers. The sharper string angle of a hunting recurve makes it more difficult to get a clean release, because the drawing fingers can get squeezed by the string.

But the hunter only needs to hit an area the size of a pie plate from 20 yards away or less to score a quick killing shot. The target archer might be trying to hit a 10-ring the size of a coffee can lid at 70 meters.

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A recurve bow built for hunting is short, maneuverable and is very powerful.

Adult men shooting target recurves generally have bows with draw weights in the 35-50-pound range, although top competition archers will pull a little bit more. Competitive women general draw 30-45 pounds. Their sole purpose is precision accuracy in shooting at paper or 3-D targets.

Bowhunters typically use bows with 45-55 pound draw weights. Depending on the game, some states require bowhunters to use bows that draw no less than 45 pounds. The hunter’s goal is to shoot a heavy arrow with enough force to pierce hides and break bones.

Tom Hall: Easton X10 vs. Carbon Express Nano Pro X-Treme

Tom Hall is an Olympic recurve archer and blogger from Great Britian. A longtime believer in the Easton X10 as the preferred arrow for competitive recurve archery, Hall recently pitted his X10s against the Carbon Express Nano Pro X-Tremes.

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Hall started his experiment by comparing the physical properties of each arrow, and then he shot them over several months in varying conditions. What he discovered surprised him. It also led him to make the switch to the Carbon Express arrows for competitions.

You can read all about Hall’s testing in an article he posted on his blog, “The Archery Project.”

How to clarify the view through your target scope magnifying lens

For indoor target archers competing in classes that allow them, magnifying lenses can greatly improve your vision of the target and allow you to be more precise in aiming.

But don’t expect to simply pop a lens in your scope housing, look through it at the target and expect everything to be crystal clear. Think about what you have to do to check your arrows by looking through binoculars. They have a focus knob that you turn to clarify your view. An archery scope housing doesn’t have that knob.

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The view of the target through a magnifying lens is often blurry without corrective measures.

When you look through your scope with a lens in it, it’s highly likely things are going to be blurry. Don’t worry. That’s normal.

The remedy varies from archer to archer. That’s understandable when you consider how much people’s eyesight varies from person to person.

It may be that you need a clarifying lens in your peep sight. If you’ve heard archers mention using a “clarifier,” this is what they’re talking about.

(If you hear them mention “verifier,” then they’re talking about this.)

To be able to add a clarifying lens to your peep, you have to be using a peep that accepts them, so make sure you’ve got such a peep. It will be threaded to receive the lens insert.

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This threaded peep is able to accept apertures and clarifying lenses.

Depending on which peep system you use, there are multiple clarifiers to choose from. The best way to find out which lens might work is to try them all until you find one that makes the target clear. For scopes with 2-5-power magnification, look for clarifiers with the lower numbers to work best. Lenses with higher magnification usually work best with clarifiers at the higher end of the spectrum.

Here’s a great reference chart from Specialty Archery to keep in mind.

 

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Generally, if the target is blurry, but the scope is clear, then try a stronger clarifier – one with a higher number. If the target is clear, but the aiming dot on your scope is blurred, try a weaker clarifier.

While you are doing this, if you find one clarifier is almost perfect, you can try sliding your scope in toward your eye or away from it, assuming your sight bar has a dovetail mount which allows for this adjustment.

If you just can’t find a clarifier that works properly – a common occurrence for people who wear eye glasses – you can try reducing the size of your peep aperture. Shrinking the aperture reduces the stream of light that reaches your eye, increasing depth of field of your vision, which brings objects into focus.

Archery peeps generally come in sizes ranging from 1/32” to 5/16”.

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Again, as you’re experimenting with peep sizes, try sliding your sight bar in and out to fix minor focus issues.

If reducing the peep size alone or adding a clarifier alone doesn’t work, you can also try different clarifiers with different sized apertures.

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The Hamskea InSight Peep Kit comes with a peep, plus multiple apertures and clarifying lenses.

In most cases, a remedy can be found somewhere within this experimentation. Once you’ve found a system that makes the target clear for you, you’re ready to start shooting.